Last edited by Mushicage
Wednesday, August 5, 2020 | History

2 edition of analysis of some storm-period variables affecting stream sediment transport. found in the catalog.

analysis of some storm-period variables affecting stream sediment transport.

H P. Guy

analysis of some storm-period variables affecting stream sediment transport.

by H P. Guy

  • 158 Want to read
  • 0 Currently reading

Published by United States GovernmentPrinting Office in Washington .
Written in English


Edition Notes

SeriesSediment transport in alluvial channels, Geological survey professional paper -- 462-E
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17492794M

Moreover, these hydraulic characteristics interact with bed particle size to affect stream bed stability (Kaufmann et al. ). Generally, channel gradient is determined by the geomorphologic setting of a stream. However, anthropogenic activities that change bedload, or one of the other factors affecting stream power, can alter channel gradients. Figure A stream-gauging station. Discharge. The discharge of a river is the volume rate of flow past a given cross section, measured in cubic feet per second, cfs (cusecs) or cubic meters per second, m3/s (cumecs).It’s not nearly as easy to measure discharge as.

explain how velocity, shear stress, depth, velocity gradient, and stream power, in conjunction with grain size, determine the likelihood of sediment entrainment, transportation, and deposition; describe relevant characteristics of stream sediment with regards to entrainment and transportation, and explain how these characteristics affect the. Hydraulic factors include depth, slope, and velocity of a stream. These factors are the characteristics which directly produce bank cutting, sediment transport, and the like. Hydraulic factors tend to change channel cross-sectional shape, pool and riffle formation, and meander shape. The hydraulics of flow in streams is complex.

The sediment delivery ratio of overland flow cell was assumed to be a function of the travel time of overland flow from given cell to the nearest downstream channel cell. For channel cells, the sediment delivery ratio was assumed to be unity. The computed and observed values were observed to have some discrepancy for monthly sediment yield. Suspended sediment, the kind of sediment that is moved in the water itself, is measured by collecting bottles of water and sending them to a lab to determine the concentration. Because the amount of sediment a river can transport changes over time, hydrologists take measurements and samples as streamflow goes up and down during a storm.


Share this book
You might also like
Callies castle.

Callies castle.

The Catechism of the Catholic Church on liturgy and sacraments

The Catechism of the Catholic Church on liturgy and sacraments

Standardization of industrial accident statistics ...

Standardization of industrial accident statistics ...

Anne of Avonlea

Anne of Avonlea

The song of Rhiannon

The song of Rhiannon

Tim, a dog of the mountains

Tim, a dog of the mountains

John Burns

John Burns

modernization of NATOs long-range theater nuclear forces

modernization of NATOs long-range theater nuclear forces

Thank You-Communion-Girl

Thank You-Communion-Girl

The genealogical record of George and Elizabeth Caven, immigrants from Ireland, and pioneer settlers in Springcreek Township, Miami County

The genealogical record of George and Elizabeth Caven, immigrants from Ireland, and pioneer settlers in Springcreek Township, Miami County

Memoirs of Benvenuto Cellini

Memoirs of Benvenuto Cellini

NAEP 1992 writing report card

NAEP 1992 writing report card

Analysis of some storm-period variables affecting stream sediment transport by H P. Guy Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. An analysis of some storm-period variables affecting stream sediment transport. [Harold P Guy; United States. Department of the Interior.; Geological Survey (U.S.)]. SEDIMENT TRANSPORT IN ALLUVIAL CHANNELS AN ANALYSIS OF SOME STORM-PERIOD VARIABLES AFFECTING STREAM SEDIMENT TRANSPORT By H.

GUY ABSTRACT This study of the effect of some natural factors on storm-period fluvial-sediment transport is a part of the development of techniques for utilization of sediment reconnaissance data. InCited by: Get this from a library.

An analysis of some storm-period variables affecting stream sediment transport. [Harold P Guy; Geological Survey (U.S.),]. stream during a storm event H.P. () An analysis of some storm-period variables affecting. stream Analysis of sediment transport is an effective approach for quantifying sediment load.

FACTORS INFLUENCING SEDIMENT TRANSPORT ON THE HEADWATER CATCHMENTS OF RÁK BROOK, SOPRON Development of the workflow “Erosion analysis” in the ArcGIS Model D mean stream depth (m) DEM Digital Elevation Model d s diameter of sediment particle (mm).

Suspended sediment concentrations and discharge for selected runoff events. lower limit may be explained by the fact that the channel and its banks constitute a source of fine sediment which is always available for transport whatever the origins of channel runoff, provided stream power is sufficient to entrain and transport it.

Drawing on recent analysis of some storm-period variables affecting stream sediment transport. book in temperate and arctic regions, we describe a conceptual model of stream-lake interactions to examine how hydrologic connections between streams and lakes can influence material transport and retention in watersheds.

Stream-lake interactions affect temperature, flow regime, and sediment transport, resulting in. The Third Edition Of This Book Recognises Two Important Developments That Have Taken Place In Recent Years.(1) Mathematical Modelling Of Alluvial River Processes, And(2) Environmental Aspects Relating To Of These Factors Have Been Duly Considered In This Edition.

With Its Detailed Analysis And Clear Presentation, This Book Would Be Extremely Useful For Practising Civil 5/5(1). Streams move downslope under the influence of gravity, the passage of water is called stream l factors control the amount of sediment that can be carried by a stream: 1) volume of stream flow, 2) the stream gradient, 3) shape of the stream channel, and 4) kinds and volume of sediments available for erosion in a drainage basin.

Sediment transport 1. Sediment Transport 2. Sediment Transport Sediment is any particulate matter that can be transported by fluid flow and which eventually is deposited as a layer of solid particles on the bed or bottom of a body of water or other liquid.

The generic categories of sediments is as follows Gravel Sand Silt Clay 3. stream design and restoration analysis. Roughness is a function of many stream physical properties includ-ing bed sediment size, vegetation, channel sinuosity, channel irregularity, and suspended sediment load.

As a result, many of the estimates have inherent degrees of empiricism in their estimate. Sediment transport also requires empirical input.

More frequent and intense rain events, can increase sediment loading from stormwater runoff. Stronger storms, higher river levels, and faster stream velocity can increase erosion and result in increased suspended sediment (turbidity) in water bodies as well as affect normal distribution of sediment along river, lake and stream beds.

(E) An analysis of some storm-period variables affecting stream sediment transport, by H. Guy. (F) Sediment transport in the Rio Grande, New Mexico, by Carl F. Nordin, Jr., and Joseph P.

Beverage. (G) Effects of water temperature on the discharge of bed material, by B. Colby and C. Scott. The sediment transport rate in particular is difficult to measure, as any measurement method will disturb the flow and thus alter the reading. Most flow rate and sediment transport rate equations attempt to simplify the scenario by ignoring the effects of channel width, shape and curvature of a channel, sediment cohesion and non-uniform flows Estimating Sediment Discharge John R.

Gray and Francisco J. Simões D.1 INTRODUCTION Sediment-discharge measurements usually are available on a discrete or periodic basis. However, estimates of sedi-ment transport often are needed for unmeasured periods, such as when daily or annual sediment-discharge values are.

ANALYSIS OF SEDIMENT TRANSPORT ASSOCIATED WITH LOW-HEAD DAMS Atiq U. Syed, and James P. Bennett U.S. Geological Survey Mercantile Way, Suite 5 Lansing, MI ABSTRACT A mathematical sediment-transport model, SEDMOD, was used to simulate stream flows and sediment transport in a river channel with four low-head dams on the Kalamazoo.

Valley or stream erosion occurs with continued water flow along a linear feature. The erosion is both downward, deepening the valley, and headward, extending the valley into the hillside, creating head cuts and steep banks.

In the earliest stage of stream erosion, the erosive activity is dominantly vertical, the valleys have a typical V cross-section and the stream gradient is relatively steep. River - River - Streamflow and sediment yield: Rapid variations of water-surface level in river channels through time, in combination with the occurrence from time to time of overbank flow in flat-bottomed valleys, have promoted intensive study of the discharge relationships and the probability characteristics of peak flow.

Stage (depth or height of flow) measurements treat water level. Sediment transport is very responsive to changes in the watershed, due to changes in both hydrology and physical characteristics. Sediment transport rates are directly related to turbidity and, consequently, are important to water quality.

Channel: Cross-section Definition. The shape, position, and materials of a stream channel cross-section. Factors affecting sediment transport, deposition and erosion in intertidal wetlands in Louisiana Boumans, Roelof Maria, Ph.D.

The Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical Col., UMI N. Zeeb Rd. Ann Arbor, MI. Guy HP () An analysis of some storm-period variables affecting stream sediment transport. US Geological Survey Professional Paper E, US Government Printing Office, Washington DC, USA Herrero A, Buendía C, Bussi G, Sabater S, Vericat D, Palau A, Batalla RJ () Modeling the sedimentary response of a large Pyrenean basin to global change.Semantic Scholar profile for T.

Nolan, with 37 highly influential citations and 97 scientific research papers.where SY (mass per unit time) represents sediment yield at a point of interest, and SE (mass per unit time) represents gross erosion rate of the area upstream of that point.

It is believed that if the relationship between SDR and its influential factors is well established, equation (1) would be greatly helpful for estimating sediment yields in ungauged locations.